Chefs & Restaurants for 522

Chefs:

Ethan Stowell

Restaurant: Owner & Executive Chef of Staple & Fancy, Anchovies & Olives, How to Cook a Wolf, Tavolata, Rione XIII, & Bar Cotto

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  We would be crazy not to support this initiative.  In this day and age, who doesn’t want to know more about what they are eating and serving their friends and families? It should be every consumer’s right to decide what foods they are buying based upon what is in them – its as simple as that.

 

 

 

DINE OUT FOR 522Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Matt Dillon

Restaurants: Sitka & Spruce, Bar Ferd’nand, The Corson Building, The Old Chaser Farm

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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
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DINE OUT FOR 522

Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!
 

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Renee Erickson

Restaurants: Chef and co-owner at Boat Street Cafe, The Walrus and the Carpenter, The Whale Wins, mobile food truck The Narwhal, and The Barnacle

Join Renee Erickson, Executive Chef & Owner of The Whale Wins, Boat Street Cafe, The Walrus & the Carpetner, and newly opened Seattle restaurant, Barnacle

for a Cocktail Party for 522

at 

October 8, 2013 from 5:30 to 7:30

Tickets: $60

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Holly Smith

Restaurant: Chef at Café Juanita

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: I am committed to organics, sustainability, and a holistic approach to the dining experience. As a chef and a parent my commitment to food extends into a commitment to supporting Yes on 522 and the campaign to label genetically modified foods in Washington State.

Join Seattle Exectutive Chefs
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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
Tickets: $125

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com.

Branden Karow

Restaurant: Chef at Staple & Fancy

DINE OUT FOR 522

Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!
 

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Diane LaVonne

Restaurant: Owner and Teacher at Diane’s Market Kitchen

Maria Hines

Restaurants: Chef and owner of Tilth, Golden Beetle, & Agrodolce

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: Labeling GMOs falls in line with the mission statement of my restaurants which are all certified organic.

Event Details!

Yes on 522 Happy Hour with Maria Hines
Golden Beetle
Golden Beetle
1744 NW Market St
Seattle, WA 98107
4pm-5pm
Join Maria Hines on Wednesday, August 28th from 4pm-5pm at the Golden Beetle in Ballard for appetizers to talk about Initiative 522, the ballot initiative to label genetically engineered foods here in Washington state.  Chef Maria Hines will talk about her support of labeling GE foods.  Campaign staff will share campaign updates.  Come learn more about Yes on 522 and talk about shoppers right to know what is in the food we eat. RSVP here!

Nicki Kerbs

Restaurant: Executive Chef of Cupcake Royale

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  Label cupcakes, not people!  Cupcake Royale wants everyone to know how much we love our fresh, natural and local ingredients. Customers deserve to know what they are putting into their bodies and especially when you buy food to share with friends, family and community. It just makes good sense, and good cupcakes.

Shane Ryan

Restaurants: Executive Chef of Matt’s in the Market

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Seif Chirchi & Rachel Yang

Restaurants:  Owner & Executive Chefs of Joule & Revel

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: As parents of young children and the owners of two restaurants, it is important to us that people should have full access to knowing what is in their food and be able to trust that their health and well-being is a priority from growers.  We strive to provide our guests with top quality ingredients prepared with culinary integrity. We strongly support a “yes” vote on Initiative 522 that will provide labeling information to shoppers about genetically engineered food in the same way that nutritional information is now available.

DINE OUT FOR 522

Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!
 

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Ryu Nakano

Restaurant: Owner & Executive Chef of Kisaku

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  I think it’s extremely important to know what is in our food so that we can choices GMO food and not.

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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com.

Lisa Owen

Restaurant: Chef & Owner of The Mark

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  I strongly support Initiative I-522 to label genetically engineered foods in Washington. It will require companies to label foods that contain GMOs, thus informing consumers about the presence of GMOs in food products. As a chef, I believe we have the right to know where our food comes from and what’s in it. How we spend the power of our money should be an informed choice.

Joshua Holmes

Restaurant: Executive Chef at Kingfisher Restaurant at Sleeping Lady Mountain Resort 

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: We all have a right to know where our food is coming from and its production methods.  Our guests that come to Sleeping Lady Mountain Resort  join us in large part because of our commitment to organic, sustainable foods.  It is critically important to us, our guests, the Leavenworth community, and my family to know what is and what is not GMO food.  Say yes to I-522.

 

Jim Drohman

Restaurants: Executive Chef & Co-Owner at Cafe Presse and Le Pichet

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: Although people may disagree about whether or not GMOs are a health problem, I believe that everyone would agree that we have a fundamental right to know what is in the food we eat. Imagine a person with a peanut allergy being told “Sorry, I can’t tell you whether or not there are peanuts in this food.” It’s just silly.

Recipe: Brandade de morue Nimoise (Salt Cod Puree in the style of Nimes). A classic French dish made with salt cod, currently on the menu at Le Pichet. Get the recipe from Jim Drohman’s blog.

Event Recap: Cafe Presse was packed for Chef Jim Drohman’s Kitchen Conversation on June 18th. Over 40 friends, patrons, and interested community members came to Cafe Presse to learn more about Yes on 522 and labeling genetically modified foods in Washington State. TVW attended & recorded part of Jim’s speech about why he supports labeling. Watch the TVW footage here.

Join Seattle Exectutive Chefs
For 15 specially prepared small bites

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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
Tickets: $125

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&

DINE OUT FOR 522

Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!
 

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Cathy Whims

Restaurants: Owner & Executive Chef of Nostrana

Matt Costello

Restaurants: Executive Chef of The Inn at Langley

Nat Stratton-Clarke

Restaurant: Café Flora

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:   Café Flora is rooted in the belief that our community should be nourished by fresh, local food. Education and knowing what goes in to the foods and products we eat and feed our families should be a right, not a privilege. We are proud to support I-522 and the labeling of genetically modified foods, and we hope our guests will join us in the effort to make this a reality for all Washington residents.

DINE OUT FOR 522

Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!
 

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Robin Leventhal

Restaurants: Chef Instructor at Wine Country Culinary Institute

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  GMO labeling should be everyone’s #1 agenda!  It is imperative that we all know what we are eating and where our food comes from. As a chef, I am deeply committed to my right and my customers’ right to know what is in their food.  I can only hope that together our collective voices are heard and GE foods are labeled in Washington state!

Meeru Dhalwala

Restaurants: Owner & executive chef of Shanik & Vij’s

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  I respect every person’s right to know exactly what is in their food. Knowing what we’re putting in our bodies, how it is made, and where it comes from is a fundamental right.  My heart, hands and 20 years of life as an intense and loving chef give me wisdom about food.  What we choose to eat, based on what is available, is the most important act of our daily life.

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Dustin Ronspies

Restaurants: Owner & executive chef of Art of Table

Jason Franey

Restaurant: Executive Chef of Canlis 

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:   I feel everyone deserves to know what they’re putting into their bodies. If the product is trustworthy, there should’t be a problem with labeling what’s in it and how it was made. We’re proud to support I-522 and all that it stands for

Jason Stratton

Restaurant: Executive Chef of Spinasse

Jerry Traunfeld

Restaurant:  Owner & Executive Chef of Poppy

 

Justin Marx

Restaurant:  Owner of Marx Foods

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: 64 countries already require labeling of genetically engineered food and a huge majority of Americans want it too.  Let’s go Washington.  Let’s get it started here in the US.

Join Seattle Exectutive Chefs
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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
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Tamara Murphy

Restaurant:  Owner & Executive Chef of Terra Plata

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  For me, it’s not about whether using genetically engineered food is right or wrong.  It’s just about having knowledge and choice.  It’s as simple as that.

Recipe:  English Pea and Mint Soup

Serves 6 to 8

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 white onion, chopped
4 cups vegetable stock
3 cups freshly shelled garden peas
1 cup fresh spinach leaves or watercress Grated zest of 1 lemon

Handful of mint leaves
1 cup crème fraîche or sour cream 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
Salt and pepper

Heat the olive oil in a soup pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté until soft. Add the vegetable stock and bring to a boil. Add the peas and cook for about 3 minutes, or until tender. Remove from the heat and let cool for a few minutes.

Working in batches, ladle some of the mixture into a blender, filling about halfway. Add a small handful of spinach or watercress and some of the lemon zest and mint leaves. This gives it even more flavor and helps to keep it a fresh green color. Blend thoroughly.With the motor running, add some crème fraîche and a bit of butter. Blend until smooth. Repeat the process until all the soup

is made. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Keep the soup warm in a pot and reheat gently when you’re ready to eat. Garnish with Pea, Mint, and Basil Pistou.

Pea, Mint, and Basil Pistou

Crush a handful of peas, then add lots of chopped fresh mint and basil and some olive oil to create a chunky relish.Add salt and pepper to taste. Put a dollop on each serving of soup.

Join Seattle Exectutive Chefs
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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
Tickets: $125

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DINE OUT FOR 522

Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!
 

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Autumn Martin

Restaurant:  Owner & Executive Chef of Hot Cakes Molten Chocolate Cakery

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  Hot Cakes Molten Chocolate Cakery is proud to stay slow and traditional, using old-world techniques and organic ingredients in all of our desserts and confections –  we would have it no other way.  I support labeling genetically engineered foods because I believe we have the right to know what’s in the foods we eat.

Join Seattle Exectutive Chefs
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HABFGAwKSwFXAR1ZXgJcTwlJVw

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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
Tickets: $125

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com.

Jason Stoneburner

Restaurant:  Owner & Executive Chef of Bastille Cafe & Bar

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: Labeling genetically engineered foods  gives people the ability to make conscious decisions of where and what their dollar is supporting and what they are choosing to put into their bodies.

Daisley Gordon

Restaurant:  Executive Chef of Marché & Cafe Campagne

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: I believe we should always know what we are putting into our bodies, and that we should have a choice as to whether or not we want to eat foods that have been genetically modified.

Join Seattle Exectutive Chefs
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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
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John Howie

Restaurant: Owner & Chef of John Howie Steak

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: believe we should always know what we are putting into our bodies, and that we should have a choice as to whether or not we want to eat foods that have been genetically modified.  

 

 

Becky Selengut

Restaurant: Chef & Author Good Fish & Shroom

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: What is truly at the core of this issue is our right to know what we are putting in our bodies.  The fact that corporations want to hide this information sends one of two obvious messages: 1. there is something worth hiding or 2. consumer concern (labeling) will hurt their bottom line. Nowhere in this defensiveness is a stated corporate concern for transparency. I whole-heartedly support the consumer’s right to know exactly what they are eating.

Recipe:  Morel Mushrooms on Brioche Toast Points with Brandy

Yield: 4 servings as an appetizer

2 cups fresh morels or 1/2 cup dried
Four 1/4” slices of brioche
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup minced shallot
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
Kosher salt or (optional) truffle salt and pepper, to taste
1 cup stock or mushroom rehydration liquid
1 teaspoon sherry vinegar
2 tablespoons brandy
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons heavy cream
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

If your morels are dried, rehydrate and strain the morels in very hot tap water for 20 minutes. Pull the
rehydrated mushrooms out of the soaking liquid, squeeze out and cut into rings. Strain the reserved liquid,
watching out for any sediment and leaving it behind. Reserve this mushroom stock.

Turn your broiler on. Trim the crust from the brioche slices and cut them diagonally into 2 triangles. Melt
the butter in a large frying pan or cast iron skillet over medium-low heat. Remove 1 tablespoon of the
butter and use it to brush on the brioche. Add the shallot, along with a small pinch of salt, to the pan with the
remaining butter and cook until lightly soft, about 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms & thyme to the pan &
increase the heat to high. Add salt to taste. Once the mushrooms have started to brown (about 5 minutes),
deglaze the pan with 1 cup of the stock plus the sherry vinegar and brandy.

Simmer until the volume of the liquid reduces by 2/3rds, about 5 minutes. While the liquid is reducing, put
the brioche on a baking sheet & broil them until the top side is toasted, then flip and toast the bottom. Once
the liquid has reduced, add the heavy cream. Continue to simmer until the sauce has thickened, 3-5 minutes
more. Add the parsley. Taste and add salt and black pepper as necessary.

Serve the toast points topped with the mushroom mixture, along with a very simple salad. To be extra
fancy, you can make a micro herb salad to place on top of the mushrooms: combine the leaves of various
soft herbs, such as parsley, thyme, nasturtium and/or edible flowers and dab them lightly with a little extra
virgin olive oil and lemon juice. Season with a smidge of salt.

Molly Wizenberg

Restaurant: Chef & Owner of Delancey & Essex

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: It’s important to me to eat real food that’s minimally processed or messed with, and that’s the kind of food that we want to serve at Delancey and Essex, too. No one yet knows what impact GMOs might have on our bodies or our ecosystems, and it’s important that we all get to make informed choices when it comes to eating or using GMO products.

Sabrina Tinsley

Restaurants: Chef and owner of La Spiga

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: We just don’t have a long history of GMO products, and we don’t know the long-term effects GMOs can have on our bodies. It’s important for people to have the right to choose if they’re going to eat or use GMO products. I support labeling because it calls larger seed manufacturers to be transparent and act more responsibly.

Joshua Theilen

Restaurant: Chef at Stumbling Goat Bistro

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: There is nothing more important to me than knowing where my food comes from. It is important when I feed my family and it is important when I prepare food for our guests at Stumbling Goat. I fully support the right to know whether our food has been genetically engineered. I am voting Yes on 522 this fall, for my food, for my family and for the right to know what is in my food.

Please Join Executive Chef Joshua Theilen

For a specially evening at

Stumbling Goat

In support of Yes on 522

on

Monday, September 16th  

from 6-8pm

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Join Seattle Exectutive Chefs
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September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
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Scott Staples

Restaurants: Chef & co-owner of Restaurant Zoe, Uneeda Burger, & Quinn’s Pub

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: I believe corporations should be held accountable for providing full disclosure about the contents of their products to consumers.  I support labeling genetically engineered foods because I support consumer’ right to know.

DINE OUT FOR 522

Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!
 

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Thierry Rautureau

Restaurant: Chef at Luc & Rover

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: As a Chef, it is hard to believe anyone would not want to know what is in their food or where it originated from. I think it is an overdue duty we have to label our foods.

Nathan Lockwood

Restaurant: Chef at Altura

Marjorie Restaurant

Owner:  Donna Moodie

Executive Chef: Dustin Calery

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: “Marjorie Restaurant is committed to using the highest quality ingredients, supporting local farmers, growers and artisans whenever possible. These values were inspired by Marjorie, for whom the restaurant is named, translating her love for making things “from scratch” to a simple understanding of knowing what we are consuming. We enthusiastically support Yes on 522, the Campaign to label genetically modified foods in Washington State, and hope others who care about what’s on the plate and what goes into our bodies join us in active support.” -Donna Moodie, Owner

Event Recap:  Yes on 522 supporters joined owner Donna Moodie and Sous Chef Thomas on Monday, July 29th for a delicious four course meal prepared with local ingredients, many of which were farmed out of Marjorie’s garden plot.  From the plantains and bean salad to the sorbet, the meal was absolutely delicious.  Supporters had a lively discussion about their support for labeling genetically engineered foods here in Washington state.

IMG_3043

Owner of Marjorie Restaurant Donna Moodie shares why she personally supports labeling for genetically modified foods

IMG_3028

Supporters enjoy a four course meal prepared by Sous Chef Thomas and lively conversation about GMO labeling

Monika Kinsman

Restaurant: Owner & Chef at Thrive

Amy Pennington

Restaurant: Cook, Author, and Urban Farmer at amy-pennington.com

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: “My love of food and education in biology intersected, leading to my interest in where the food I eat comes from. I am committed to educating and inspiring others to enjoy the qualities of locally grown food. This commitment naturally extends to my support of labeling genetically modified foods in Washington state.”

Recipe: Coriander Ribs with Rhubarb BBQ Sauce

Amy-Pennington-Rhubarb-ribs

This recipe has become a household favorite. Regionally, the ratio of tart to sweet varies greatly in traditional BBQ sauce, but I prefer a less sweet version. Here, rhubarb takes the place of vinegar in the sauce, enhancing the tart-sweet balance. The sauce can be used as a side once the ribs are cooked and served, allowing an extra little something for dipping. The pork ribs are first dry-rubbed and then slow roasted in a low oven, which makes for succulent, fall-off-the-bone meat. In the final minutes of cooking, the ribs are doused with a rhubarb sauce (made from burned sugar and rhubarb mash) and allowed to caramelize slightly before serving. Although the recipe uses an oven, you can just as easily grill these ribs, when the weather permits. Serves 4

Coriander ribs
• 3 to 4 pounds pork ribs, racked or precut
• 1 tablespoon ground cumin
• 1 tablespoon coriander seeds, crushed
• 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 1 tablespoon ground fennel
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Rhubarb BBQ sauce
• 1/2 cup sugar
• 1 cup warm water
• 1 pound rhubarb (about 3 to 4 stalks), trimmed and cut into 2-inch pieces

Place the ribs in a large baking pan. Sprinkle the cumin, coriander seeds, cinnamon, fennel, salt, and pepper over the ribs. Using your hands, toss to coat, working the spices evenly across each rib until most of the spices are absorbed. Set aside at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F. Place the ribs in the oven and roast for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, until meat is tender and comes away easily from the bone.

While the ribs are roasting, make the sauce. In a small saucepan, pour in the sugar and shake gently, so it forms an even layer along the bottom of the pan. Set this over medium-high heat, the sugar will start melting after a few minutes. Do not stir the sugar, but monitor it closely. It will begin to brown at the edges. Swirl the pan slightly to distribute the heat and hot caramel, making sure to keep the sugar level so it does not coat the sides of the saucepan. The caramel will turn dark brown and amber at the edges. Continue swirling gently until all of the sugar is dark amber, about 5 to 7 minutes, and smells of burned sugar. Pour in the warm water and stir. Be careful: the caramelized sugar will sputter and pop. Cook until the caramelized sugar has dissolved.

Add the rhubarb and bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to low and allow the rhubarb to simmer 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the mixture cool slightly, about 20 minutes. Once cooled, add the rhubarb sauce to a blender and pur{eacute}e until perfectly smooth. Pour the rhubarb sauce into a small bowl and set aside.

When the ribs are cooked through, remove them from the oven and set aside. Increase the oven temperature to 425 degrees F. Brush the ribs with half of the rhubarb sauce. Return to the oven and let the sauce caramelize and bubble, about 10 to 12 minutes. Remove the ribs from the oven and let cool slightly. Serve the ribs alongside a small bowl of the remaining rhubarb sauce.

PANTRY NOTE: Any leftover sauce or ribs (although I doubt you’ll have any) can be covered and held in the fridge, up to 3 days. The rhubarb sauce recipe can be doubled and the ribs basted twice for extra-rich flavor, if you like.

Ami Karnosh

Restaurant: Owner of Yummy Mummy Cookies

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: Scientists have long known that while GM food itself might look and taste the same, the result of artificially altering the genetic basis of the food we eat changes the inherit nourishing qualities. It is our right to have a choice whether we eat these foods or not. Labeling packages with the genetically modified ingredients is a simple, inexpensive way to allow us the freedom to choose to have a more healthful diet without these ingredients.

Recipe:

Moroccan Quinoa

This is one of my many go-to recipes and frequently requested dishes at family events. It sounds gourmet but is so very easy and tastes better as leftovers. If you’re unfamiliar with quinoa, it is a great grain to have on hand as it is very high in protein, fiber and minerals but it cooks fast. The key is to rinse it very well using a fine mesh strainer (since the grains are so small). This will remove the outer coating on the grain leaving it sweeter and easier to digest.

Use 1 ¾ cups broth or water for every 1 cup dry quinoa. Rinse quinoa in a fine-mesh sieve under running warm water. Place quinoa in pan with water and bring to boil. Cover, then reduce to simmer and let sit 15 minutes. If you want a more flavorful grain, replace some of the water with stock or a little white wine. I prefer to use my rice cooker. Simply turn it on and walk away! The grain is fully cooked when the liquid has cooked off and little “tails” unwind from the individual round grains.

For the recipe:
roughly 2 cups cooked quinoa
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
½ cup tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, cilantro arugula or other dark, leafy green
1 clove garlic, minced finely
3/4 teaspoon cumin
1-2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup currants (soaked in a little warm water to plump up)
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Mix all ingredients together in a bowl. Let sit for a few minutes to absorb the flavors and taste. Adjust to add more cinnamon or salt as desired. This may be served warm or chilled.

Norman & Kristen Six

Restaurant: Owner & Chef at Lovitt Restaurant

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food: We’re concerned about the potential health impacts of GMOs and strongly support the labeling of genetically engineered foods so that we can make informed decisions about the food we consume.

KP Panyathong

Restaurants: Executive Chef at Manhattan

Why I Support Labeling GMO Food: For myself and for the chefs I know, our ultimate goal is to know exactly where everything comes from, especially when we feed our children and our families. It’s that much more special to serve food when you know it’s high quality and where it comes from.

Elizabeth Vincent

Restaurant: Chef at Herban Feast

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  We, as consumers, need to be aware of what we are feeding our future generations.  With proper labeling, we can be more proactive about our choices.  With knowledge, we will have the upper hand.

Join Seattle Exectutive Chefs
For 15 specially prepared small bites

sponsored by 

in support of 

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on

September 19, 2013 at 6:30pm
Tickets: $125

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com.

Karen Jurgensen

Restaurant: Chef & teacher at Seattle Culinary Academy & Quillisascut Farm School

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  Voting YES on 522 honors Washingtonian’s right to know what’s in the food they eat and allows them to make informed choices about what they feed their families.

Melissa Nyffeler

Restaurant: Dinette

DINE OUT FOR 522

Enjoy seven specially prepared small plates at seven different Capitol Hill restaurants on Thursday, October 3rd.  Purchase your passport to Dine Out for 522 on Capitol Hill.  Then bring along your restaurant passport, your ID, and your friends as you hop from restaurant to restaurant on Capitol Hill to enjoy different small plates and discuss the importance of labeling genetically engineered foods!
 

October 3, 2013 from 5pm-10pm
Passport: $50

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For more information, please email katie@yeson522.com

Seth Caswell

Restaurants: Executive chef of Google, Kirkland campus

Why I Support Labeling of GMO Food:  I support the labeling of GMO foods as a member of the Washington chef community and as a loving husband.  My customers, as well as my family, have the right to know what we are eating and putting into our bodies.  Many countries already support this documentation and it is time for WA and the US to step up to this responsible action.